A Bigger Blizzard

In a previous post entitled Snow, Snow, Snow I showed the aftermath of our first official blizzard of the season.  The heavy weather then lasted for most of the day, with wind gusts sometimes reaching 100km/h.  This time around we’ve done it bigger and better, with two and a half days of winds around 120km/h; the gusts approached 160km/h.  Better still, we had a significant amount of snow falling to add to the fun.

It’s the first time for the season that we’ve been more-or-less stuck indoors for a decent period of time.  Apart from a few quick sorties to the workshop or the operations building, everyone stayed indoors and did their best to stay busy.  At comms, we’d set ourselves up with a couple of days worth of tasks that were all computer-based, so I worked from my room.  For those that couldn’t work from ‘home’, they helped in the kitchen or wherever they could.

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So now what I have for you is a the aftermath.  As you can see, it’s quite an impressive amount of snow.  Thanks to the strong and persistent winds the snow is all very firmly packed too; packed hard enough to hold itself up in several doors around the station.

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In turn, this marks the start of shoveling season.  This is the very same door as the photo above, which is now accessible thanks to the hard work of one of our electricians.

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This is the large pile of snow that’s been deposited on the windward side of the Living Quarters (LQ).  The snow is packed solid and is over two metres deep.  The patterns left in the snow all around the station are quite amazing.

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These particular shapes and forms were caused by the wind blowing up through the veranda.  The direction of the wind and the placement of the LQ and Sleeping and Medical Quarters (SMQ) near each other caused the wind to accelerate between the two buildings.  Where the air was fastest, the ground is scoured clean of snow.  Vortices form around the building next to this airflow, and in turn we get amazing things to look at.

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Here’s some more of the strange deposition of snow on the veranda.  The little blizz tails on the leeward side of each pole are about 15 centimetres long, which is quite impressive.  It’ll be fun to check each morning and see them bend, fall off, etc.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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These bottom two photos show the LQ veranda from early April when we’d just had our first blizzard, and from the blizzard we’ve just had.  It’s not hard to see how much more snow we had this time.

Last of all, I have an arty kind of shot I’d like to show you all.  I usually process my photos in such a way that they represent what I saw at the time.  Rather than aiming for accuracy of colour, I try to make the photos look how I remember seeing them in person; so they are coloured not only by the brain’s visual processing but also by non-visual parts of the memory.  Sometimes, however, I get to playing around in Lightroom and end up discovering a photo with hidden detail that is brought out by over-processing the photo.  Here’s one that I found quite interesting:

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One Comment on “A Bigger Blizzard

  1. Wow very impressive indeed buddy hope your health is just as good to down there

    Cheers for now

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

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